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National Geographic writer and explorer Dan Buettner studies the world’s longest-lived peoples, distilling their secrets into a single plan for health and long life. To find the path to long life and health, Dan Buettner and team study the world’s “Blue Zones,” communities whose elders live with vim and vigor to record-setting age. At TEDxTC, he shares the 9 common diet and lifestyle habits that keep them spry past 100.

We hope you enjoy this video about lifestyle and aging around the world! Remember your thoughts and actions create your reality. So, put your awareness on that which you truly want to manifest.

Marion Ross Ph.D. and Tracy Latz M.D.

On Valentine’s Day, Let’s all join in prayer, meditation, tapping or any form of healing you practice for Haiti and the rest of the Planet at 5pm est ! We are so powerful when we collectively set our intentions to heal.
Not only is it a Valentine’s Day in the West, it is also the Lunar New Year Day in the East, and the beginning of a new 500 year cycle “Pachacuti” in the Incan, Mayan, and Aztec tradition.

Wherever you are, on this special day, send your LOVE, BLESSINGS and POSITIVE GOOD THOUGHTS to everyone, You may visualize the persons and the Earth with LOVE and LIGHT.
Let’s Shift the planet together. This is the power of love & social networking!
Marion Ross Ph.D and Tracy Latz M.D.

Please click on the following link to experience a rebalancing of your chakras:
Sit back, relax and ENJOY!!!

Marion Ross PhD. & Tracy Latz M.D.

Our recent radio interview with JaiKaur on Blog Talk Radio on January 22, 1010

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via “Shift” authors Tracy Latz and Marion Ross join JaiKaur.

More than ever this a time for sharing and spreading our love and light globally. We have been meditating and sending positive thoughts individually and collectively with groups from the Global Coherence Initiative.
We personally donate to Partners In Health, an organization that has been on the ground in Haiti for 20 years.
This is a great organization with minimal up front administrative costs. If you are interested in donating to medical assistance in Haiti, click on the link:https://donate.pih.org/page/contribute/haiti_earthquake?source=earthquake&subsource=email121

Here is the latest update I have received from PIH

Wednesday morning, a strong aftershock earthquake rocked Port-au-Prince, temporarily shutting down operations at the general hospital in Port-au-Prince, as well as several other PIH sites outside the city. Since then additional smaller quakes continue to disrupt efforts on the ground.

Here’s a quick update on our work in Haiti despite these challenges.

PIH’s surgical teams continue to race against time to provide surgical care to earthquake victims in Port-au-Prince. Operating rooms at the central general hospital (HUEH) in Port-au-Prince are fully operational again after being temporarily evacuated on yesterday in response to the aftershock. PIH is still coordinating the relief efforts at HUEH and reports having 12 operating rooms opened 24 hours per day. Across the country, we have a total of 20 operating rooms up and running.

To date, PIH has sent 22 plane loads with 144 medical volunteers – orthopedic surgeons, anesthesiologists, surgical nurses and other medical professionals – and several thousand pounds of medical supplies to support the more than 4,500 PIH health care providers already in Haiti.

Despite these accomplishments, our teams throughout the country continue to report a great need for additional medicines (antibiotics, anesthesia and narcotics), medical equipment (anesthesia machines and x-rays), medical supplies (IVs, tubing, irrigating saline), and water.

“There are very sick people and too little space and time,” reported PIH Women’s Health Coordinator Sarah Marsh from our hospital in St. Marc. She added that we will lose more patients to infection in the coming days if we don’t find additional medications, and explained that is only for lack of supplies – not patients – that the surgical team risks performing more operations. A volunteer orthopedist also working from St. Marc stressed that we will need full medical teams on site to manage dressings, skins grafts and other post operative care for another 6-8 weeks.

Our sites in the Central Plateau and the lower Artibonite are dealing with increasing numbers of patients and families seeking both medical treatment and refuge from devastated Port-au-Prince. Finding space and beds for post-operative care has become the next major challenge. In Cange, PIH’s 104-bed facility is overflowing: the church is serving as a triage center and the school as a recovery room. People are arriving in Cange at all hours of the day and night; many simply have nowhere to go.

“Our houses were crushed and our businesses destroyed. So we came to Cange,” said one man who arrived in a bus with 12 relatives, including his mother-in-law who was critically injured. In Belladaire, near the border with the Dominican Republic (DR), up to 1,000 people are camped out at PIH’s hospital in temporary shelter, searching for family members and medical treatment. We expect that people will continue to return to the countryside, having lost their family, livelihoods, and homes in the capital city, and meeting the needs of this displaced population will be a major task in PIH’s long-term rebuilding efforts.

Finally, recognizing that many of our own Haitian staff, who are working tirelessly to save the lives of others, have also lost their own families and friends, PIH is also developing a post-trauma mental health and social service program to serve both staff and patients.

The task ahead is a monumental one. And even as we heal wounds, mend broken bones, and provide basic necessities (food, water, shelter), its true magnitude grows before our eyes. But we know from 20-plus years of accompaniment the resiliency of the Haitian people. Through poverty, strife, hurricanes, disease and hunger, our Haitian friends and colleagues continue to amaze us. Their determination, spirit, and ability to overcome and survive is inspirational and humbling.

Partners In Health is determined to do whatever it takes, for as long as it takes, to ensure that their struggle succeeds.

With your help, we know we will be able to do so.

Kenbe fem,

Ali Lutz
Haiti Program Coordinator

A Green Christmas– A Million Trees for Michael

What better way to pay tribute and remember Michael Jackson’s dream of healing the Earth, than to plant trees of peace this holiday season? Give a gift back to him and heal the planet by donating a minimum of $15 to plant 15 seedlings toward the ‘Michael Jackson Memorial Forest Project’.

Each of us can make a difference when we work together to heal the world. Trees absorb green house gases, provide habitat for creatures large and small, plus prevent soil erosion. Be sure to tell your  friends about this project. Let’s get everyone we know involved. So, plant some trees today! You will never be sorry you did… and neither will your children~ What a fabulous gift for generations to come !

American Forests will be putting up a special link on their website called, “A Million Trees For Michael” and fans will eventually be able to donate online. Until that happens, however, these are the ONLY two ways to donate:
The first way, send a check or money order to:

American Forests
734 15th St. NW, Ste 800
Washington, DC 20005

The second way, if you prefer to pay by credit card, is to call them at (800) 545-TREE (8733) and do this over the phone. There is a $15. They will  also give you a certificate.

For more information on this project go to: www.forgivenessandpeace.comwww.AmericanForests.org

Join A Million Trees for Michael fan page on facebook: http://bit.ly/7HOZyY and lets promote a green and caring Holiday Season!

Join  Best Selling authors Tracy Latz & Marion Ross on the Radio Show Going Home with Mark Cope – News/Talk 96.6 KXYL at 6:10pm EST on Friday the 11th.

We will be talking about the “Inner Grinch” and how to handle stress during the Holidays.